About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
CSPAN 5
CSPAN2 4
KQED (PBS) 3
KQEH (PBS) 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
WETA 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and he's absolutely right. i think it's not religion itself. i mean, it's the baggage that comes with it, frankly, that's in the name of religion, people are doing horrible things. >> pitts: and in the pakistan of your youth, you could... whatever your faith was was acceptable. >> khan: absolutely, and not only was it acceptable, it was respected.
over." >> khan: yeah, yeah, and he's absolutely right. i think it's not religion itself. i mean, it's the baggage that comes with it, frankly, that's in the name of religion, people are doing horrible things. >> pitts: and in the pakistan of your youth, you could... whatever your faith was was acceptable. >> khan: absolutely, and not only was it acceptable, it was respected. >> pitts: the man who grew up on cricket in pakistan says his passion for american football began at the university of illinois, cheering on the fighting illini. with financial success came the opportunity to buy into the game at the highest level. khan says he leaves the football side of the business to others, but expects the best from his players. so one of his first moves was to provide them with what's said to be the best locker room in the nfl. >> khan: this is about comfort. this is about recognition. this is about setting standards. >> pitts: and in a strategy he hopes will pay dividends for the team and jacksonville, he announced plans for the jaguars to play one home game in london for the next four se
a mormon. well, this country was founded on different relidges relidgens and mormon is a christian religion. so would people rather have a muslim -- host: the spt not a muslim and i think you know that. but let's talk about the subject of religion north carolina being a big state on the bible belt and what's the feeling as far as you've been able to see regarding governor romney and his mormonism in north carolina? guest: first of all, i would just like to say that i agree with nancy to the extent that this country was founded on religious freedom so i do not think that someone's religion could come into the conversation in a negative manner. and as you stated president obama is a christian and not a muslim so that's something that needs to be made clear. it just happens to be that he's a christian and that's what he is. but that's a conversation that we should not get into the weeds on when that's not supposed the crux of our election when we are a country that was founded on our religious freedom host: our next caller is from william. caller: how are you doing? guest: well. how are you? c
can visit someone in the hospital regardless of your religion or no religion, regardless of who you do or do not sleep with, right, we're talking about the right to be with a loved one, not a gay right to be with a loved one. so that is so important because that's where we're headed because young people already see it that way. it's only older people that you have to get on this thing that it's not about marriage. so i do think it's shifting. i agree that you see the political energy in the democratic party with governor cuomo, as well. i don't think, though, as a legal matter that she they should be on ballots at all. >> again, california has ending the death penalty on there, changing the three strikes law.. >> again, california has ending the death penalty on there, changing the three strikes law.. >> again, california has ending the death penalty on there, changing the three strikes law. things that i as a progressive would be generally supportive of, and yet my concern is when at the show up on ballot measures rather than showing up in our state legislature as did doing the work o
to be built in their state. host: she brought up religion, so let's talk about the role of churches, parishes, synagogues can play in the campaign and whether they are allowed to contribute. guest: they're not contributing directly to the campaigns, just like a corporation could not contribute. so we're not seeing money come directly from religious organizations. but certainly people's beliefs, people's attitudes toward important political issues are sometimes if shaped by their religious beliefs. and they have been important to populations -- they have been important population, people you can rely on in the election, since they are older and have certain religious beliefs. but they cannot play a financial goal. host: john is a democrat. caller: i just wanted to say that bush, romney, and the republicans have set up this tax structure which helps these companies take our jobs overseas for cheaper labor. and the internet will also suck up a lot of jobs in the coming future. you can have a job almost anywhere, so all the tax money but being received, i believe, is going to go to corporations w
whether they get to eat. religion is banned. there is no rule of law, and perceived political infractions are met with harsh punishment, punishment, i should add, that is often needed out to the three generations of a person's family , and political offenders knows that when he goes to present his parents and his children will probably go with him. there are probably about 200,000 north koreans today in the gulag, and more than a million, perhaps as high as 2 million have already died there. the reason we know all of this and much, much more is thanks to the testimonies of north koreans to have escaped. these are the people i write about in my book. this knowledge comes to us despite the best efforts of the family regime to keep it secret. for more than 50 years, ever since the end of the korean war, north korea has been sealed off from the world's eyes. the family regime has pursued an isolationist policy and it maintains an iron grip on information, access to which is very strictly controlled. to give just one example, every radio must be registered with the government, and its style mu
, as a catholic, how has your view on abortion been shaped by religion? >> i am episcapalian. my husband is a cathlic, my children are catholics. we raise our children as catholics. i am happy to talk about my view on abortion. it is that it should be safe, legal, and rare. i've worked hard on the rare part, because i wanted to make sure this is not just something that divides us politically, and that i would work to make sure we reduce the number of unintended pregnancies and helped unemployed men and women get a job. i work with an organization that does research and now has the beginning evidence to show that we have reduced the number of abortions in iowa by 26% and unintended pregnancies by 8%. i have been in washington talking about the results of this and we hope that this will be a model for the nation. about't have to talk abortion if we make sure that people have access to contraceptives. i would like congressman king to explain what his view is on that. he has said that -- i would like to know if he believes that women in this community have the right to -- the legal right to
going to bordeaux and saying to people, "i've got a great new religion for you and, by the way, give up your wine." >> narrator: the task: to put on a suit and tie, and climb on your bicycle. >> the tried and true and well-worn method was knocking on doors. and so we knocked on thousands and thousands and thousands of doors. >> the mormon mission does teach you to deal with rejection. most people are not thrilled to see a pair of mormon missionaries on their door. >> narrator: rejection was at the heart of the experience. >> and it means cultivating your own inner spiritual life. where else are you going to get the resources and the strength to carry on this difficult work of knocking on people's doors and pleading with them to listen to you unless you feel like god is with you? >> narrator: and during that time, mitt was worried about the news from home. his father was running for president. >> we would get a hold of the herald tribuand kind of keep up on what was happening. >> narrator: the news was not good. george's campaign was in trouble. he had changed his position on the vietnam
recounts his life in fractalist. in of africa, africa's culture, religion, history and identity. look for these titles in bookstores this coming we can watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> could have wanted more but in the conference can only do so much so want diversity. you want democrats, republicans, different parts of the country. everyone at different ages. we knew on the basis of nine, you can't make generalizations that are 100% certain. we may say as much in the book because conclusions are hypothesis that other people might run with but in order to make those hypotheses we needed a fairly diverse group. >> we also have the white house project for the last couple election cycles and several of the women identified several years before the 2008 election, kathleen sibelius, both in there, and barbara lee has been here several years from now when you did the last round with her foundation and talked about looking at women governors. we wanted to look at women governors who had been through barbara lee's training through the pipeline. we also m
-presidential candidate. as a catholic, how has your view on abortion issue by your religion? i am in the past billion. i guess i can't answer that question. my husband is a catholic, i'm an episcopalian. my grandchildren have been baptized in the catholic church and we have been raised as catholics, but i would be happy to talk about my view on abortion. my view is it should be safe, legal, and rare. >> here is a valid point that is constructive and is a difference that is not manufactured -- we have babies in america and in iowa being aborted simply because they are little baby girls because the mother want a boy instead of a girl. we have evidence coming in on that from the asian community. of legislation prohibiting sex- selecting abortion. i think it matters and i think it matters to the liberals being aborted. >> follow races from across the country on c-span, c-span radio and on line. >> the house and senate came in a short time ago for a brief pro forma session but no legislative business. aside from that, the federal government remained closed today. hurricane sandy blue through overnight. presi
or any religious leaders say this. you already know all you need to know about religion. if you have been going to church or synagogue or a mosque for one year or 10 years or 25 years waiting to know enough about god so you can swing into action, i am telling you you already know enough. you know deep in your heart that you know enough. you know what to do. jesus reminds us with every story, every parable, every teaching, at the commandment, we are to bring good news to the poor. we are to let the oppressed go free and proclaim the lord's favor. i wonder how many people are drowning in loudly next, hertz, sand, doubt and despair. -- hurt, doubt, and despair. how many do not have hurt, loneliness, doubt, and despair. how many know this and do not respond? [applause] just like jesus' hometown synagogue in nazareth, everyone of us of every faith tradition stands just by our own familiar stories of faith and transformation. what we already know of god's reconciling message. democrats, you already know what to do. republicans, you already know what to do. followers of christ, you already know
that i thought was guaranteed under the constitution, the practice of your religion, that now there has to be an amendment put forward to bring that about. if the law was never passed, the lawsuit wouldn't be in place, and religious freedom, today, would not be in question. >> moderator: continuing with rebuttals, mr. horning, 30 seconds. horning: there's a lot of misunderstanding, and there's no real winning the issue. unfortunately, it's one of those that, you know, it's an outcome of something terrible happening sometimes, and it's dealing with life situation nobody wants. we can't do justice to it. as a federal legislature, i can't do justice to it. i would fail in what i would try to achieve. >> moderator: thank you. mr. donnelly? donnelly: my faith guided me on the issue, and i know their faiths have guided my friends who are up here as well. we have a program in my town called the women's care center. what they do is provide a positiontive alternative. for women who are pregnant, there's an opportunity for a place to live, a place to be cared for, and for somebody to know there's
state. people aren't slaves of the kim family regime. they control even if they get to eat. religion, and no rule of law , percy political infractions are met with harsh 10-- punishment meted out three generations of political fender knows when he goes to present his parents and his children will pare -- probably go with him. there are 200,000 north koreans today in the gulag may be as high as 2 million have already died. the reason reno this and much more is the testimony of those who have escaped for the these are the people i write about in my book this comes despite the regime broke to keep it secret. north korea has been not from the world's eyes. the regime has pursued the isolationist policy and has an iron grip want access on which is strictly controlled. to give one example every radio must be registered and the dial must be fixed to the government-run radio station. security police equipped with scanners tried to identify households where residents have tinkered with the radio and tuning in to foreign broadcast. surveys of north koreans hiding in china show a high percentag
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)